RBS To Pay $1.1bn Fine For 2008 Crisis-Related Malpractice

September 29, 2016
RBS To Pay $1.1bn Fine For 2008 Crisis-Related Malpractice September 29, 2016 Clive Nelson https://plus.google.com/110107075468979879828/

Royal Bank of ScotlandBritish bank the Royal Bank of Scotland will need to pay $1.1 billion to a U.S. regulator to settle allegations of financial malpractice in selling mortgage bonds to credit unions ahead of the 2008 mortgage crisis.

The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) has levied the fine on RBS for selling financial instruments called residential-mortgage- backed securities (RMBS) and the fine is part of a settlement to close two cases filed against RBS. The bank’s chief executive, Ross McEwan said that the amount was included in the provisions of $5.6 billion already set aside by the bank, but warned that there are other U.S. institutions who could levy further penalties on RBS.

McEwan pointed out that bank was in talks with NCUA as well as the Federal Housing Finance Agency but not with the U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ). The DOJ is likely to impose a hefty fine, which analysts have estimated can go upto £9 billion.

Reuters

In a statement, RBS said,

As previously stated, RMBS litigation and investigations may require additional provisions in future periods that in aggregate could be materially in excess of the (current) provisions.

McEwan had initially hoped that RBS’ discussions with the DOJ would be concluded by this year, but now there are indications that it might only be finalized next year.

Deutsche Bank is one of the other banks facing punitive action from the DOJ, with negotiations for a fine said to start at $14 billion. The magnitude of the fine has pulled down Deutsche Bank’s share price to 30-year lows in the past few weeks and is causing anxiety in Germany.

RBS’ shares have been battered by Deutsche Bank’s troubles closing at 175p – far below the 502p average price that was paid for its shares by the taxpayer in the £45.5 billion bailout package. The bank has been hit by Brexit woes like all UK financial companies, but the extent of loss has been among the highest.

The UK government owns 73 percent of the bank and previously had plans to sell its stake over the next four years. The company is now worth a mere £15 billion. McEwan warned earlier this year that it would be challenging for the company to meet its 2019 target of 12 percent return on equity.The bank may not also be able to meet its 2017 target of selling 300 branches of its Williams & Glyn business, which might result in a fresh fine.

About the Author

Clive Nelson

Clive Nelson Author

Hi, my name is Clive Nelson and welcome to Traders Bible. Just to tell you bit about myself…I have been trading FX and binary options for the best part of 10 years now. After graduating with honours in economics, I began working for an investment bank in New York as an assistant trader before working my way up. After a few years, I went on to work as a broker in London, England and then eventually came back to the U.S to work in a hedge fund, where I manage $800 million of my clients’ investments. There have been times over the course of my career where I’ve had to take a hit, but I’ve accepted that losing is part of the game, it’s a learning curve. I’ve learnt from my mistakes and you don’t have to make the same errors I did. A lot of my education came from when I was a broker and this is why I’m here to tell you that Traders’ Bible offers you the foundations of how to become a great trader.


Related Articles

HSBC Avoids another Fine

Whilst the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority has recently been showing its teeth and forcing many banking institutions to pay huge

ASIC Confirms Refunds For ANZ & Westpac Credit Card Holders

Two of Australia’s biggest banks are returning a collective amount of $21 million to their credit card holders after corporate

CarMax slides on missing Q1 consensus, rising competition

Earlier last week, used-car retailer CarMax Inc. (KMX) reported its fiscal 2016 first-quarter results that were below the analysts’ estimates.